MBM: Unique Tips to Set Up a Successful Blog Tour by Danyelle Ferguson

March Book Madness hosted by Rebecca Belliston

Welcome to the third day of March Book Madness! (For a complete schedule and explanation, see below this post.)

Today I have my author friend, Danyelle Ferguson, here as a guest presenter. Not only is she an amazingly talented author and blogger, but I’ve been able to work with Danyelle on the Storymakers Midwest Conference committee. She puts a lot of time and loving into the writing community, and I’m excited she took some time out of her schedule to visit with us today about some fun tips for blog tours.

So here she is.

Unique Tips to Set Up Blog Tour by Danyelle Ferguson

Unique Tips to Set Up Successful Blog Tours – by Danyelle Ferguson

Most authors – no matter if they are traditionally or self published – set up their own blog tours. Some authors band together with peers who write in the same genre, then do a big blog tour or contest together (like the Massive Romance Reader Squee Moment Ahead contest). Other authors send a “Call to Review” on their blogs, social media or newsletters.

But what if you want to hit a broader market? Or to target certain niche readers? A great blog tour has reviewers with both small (100+) and big (1000+) follower counts, reviewers who have relationships with the author & those who don’t know the author, as well as covers a variety of geographical locations.

For my first book – (dis)Abilities and the Gospel – I wanted to get a wide variety of reviewers. Very few people on the tour were writer friends. My goal was to have a lot of reviewers who didn’t know me, who attended different churches, and who either had kids with cognitive disabilities or were church teachers who had someone in their class with a cognitive disability.

My second book, Sweet Confections, was a whole other ball of wax. I went from nonfiction to fiction. Specifically sweet romances. I had a some great reviewers from my established circle who reviewed both nonfiction and fiction, but my goal was to hit the much-better romance market. And not just in the USA.

It sounds complicated. It’s not. It sounds time consuming. It is. But each tour was totally worth it. Here’s how I found the right reviewers for each book:

(PS – this method works for cover reveals, contests, giveaways, etc.)

First: Get Organized.

I’m a huge spreadsheet organization freak. It’s probably the only area I’m really good at keeping everything on track (Ask my hubby. I’m horrible at keeping my desk organized!) But spreadsheets – I can whip them out like crazy and keep track of gobs of things that way. And a good spreadsheet is essential when putting together a blog tour.

So, let’s get started.

Create a spreadsheet with the following fields:

  • Reviewer’s Name
  • Blog Title
  • Blog Address
  • Email Address
  • # of Followers
  • Target (for me this was either parent, church teacher, or book reviewer)
  • Contacted On (date you emailed review request)
  • Response
  • Scheduled Review Date
  • Review Copy Sent

Add blogs you’re interested in to this list. Once you’ve done all your research, sort the list by number of followers and pick some of the bigger blogs and mark those lines in another color. Then sort the list by targets to see which demographics you need more of and mark those with a different color. Then look for location, etc. until you have the right mix for the amount of blogs you want on your tour.

Remember – bigger doesn’t always mean better. Getting your book into the hands of the right reviewers is more important than getting it into a lot of reviewers’ hands (especially if those reviewers have a limited reach or have a major crossover in followers).

Then start sending emails to the bloggers.

I had a lot of people return my emails saying they had never done a book review or participated in a blog tour. I sent them additional information, along with expectations for the tour (I gave them the option to choose a date within the tour time frame and told them I wanted their honest opinion about the book).  Don’t be afraid to choose reviewers who don’t have book blogs, but have a connection to the topic related to your book. During my tour, one of my reviewers was a cake decorator who had a child with autism. Her review not only introduced my book to a large group I wasn’t connected with, but was also picked up by several e-magazines. (See Ashlee Marie Cakes)

Tip: The first spreadsheet is essential for research, but Google forms are freaking AMAZING! With my Sweet Confections blog tour, I set up a Google form for the reviewers to use to sign up. When I emailed them, I invited them to visit the link and sign up on the form. It saved me so much time! They entered all their info, dates they preferred, if they were doing a book review, author interview or book spotlight, etc. The form can be embedded into your blog, website or you can use the private link Google gives you. The fabulous thing is no matter which form is used (because you can have it in multiple locations at the same time), all the info goes directly into the same spreadsheet, in all the right columns, on your Google Drive. Holy awesome, Batman! You can see an example of the form here for my Love Under Construction cover reveal sign up. On the Google form spreadsheet, I added additional columns to track when I send the confirmation emails and the cover.

Start with Your Contacts

If you’re traditionally published, shoot an email over to your marketing team and ask if they have any blog book reviewers they recommend. My publisher actually had a few and even offered to send those bloggers review copies.

I also emailed out to some disability and church groups I work with to see if they had recommendations, blogs they frequently went to for information, etc.  If you write YA, email out to your nieces, nephews, church youth groups, your friends’ kids, etc and ask them what blogs or social media accounts they go to check out cool stuff. Don’t forget your writers groups. My Romance Writers of America group was a fantastic source to recommend reviewers.

Blog Tour Services

For my Sweet Confections tour, I researched blog tour services that specialized in romance. Then I checked out the lineups in the current tours. Some reviewers went for just spicy and hot, while others had a mix of all heat levels. I kept track of which reviewers gave good reviews to clean romances and added them to my research spreadsheet. By pulling select reviewers from a variety of blog tours, I created a wider marketing audience.

Note: Blog tour services are fabulous for authors who prefer to go the hassle-free route. I know many authors who’ve had successful blog tours with good services. I, personally, feel like each blog tour service has a particular group of reviewers, who then have the same group of readers or giveaway fanatics who follow that group of reviewers. So if you are going this route, check out previous tours to see how wide their review circle is in the comment section (are the same people commenting on each blog).

Twitter

Twitter was actually my best resource to discover new reviewers. If you’re not on Twitter, then you should start a profile. It’s a great way to connect with others – even if you don’t post daily.

who to follow twitterOn the Twitter homepage, there’s a link at the top that says “Who to Follow”. If you click on it, it brings you to a page with a search box.

You can search for anything here (book reviewers, YA Romance, etc). You can also search for books that are like yours – for example, In Your Dreams by Kristan Higgins. Twitter searches through status updates and profile descriptions to suggest friends for you.

For my DAG tour, I searched for autism, LDS autism, Down syndrome, special needs, and church to name a few. I went through about a hundred profiles, checked out their activity and following. I also looked who that person followed. I often found more good leads that way. After narrowing down who I wanted to review, I contacted them through either Twitter email or an email address that was listed on the profile.

Another tip is to do geographical searches – such as Autism Canada or Sweet Romance Reader Arizona. Take advantage of hashtag searches too. Check out authors who write in the same genre and see what they are doing on Twitter. Elana Johnson did a huge Twitter promo for her book Possession using the hashtag #tagged. You could go through the postings with that hashtag to find readers who loved her book, then contact them to review your book.

Amazon & Goodreads

The awesome thing about Amazon and Goodreads is that they link to their reviewers profiles. Some of those reviewers list their websites or blogs. So you can check out books similar to yours and do some research on readers. Find a few who you really like, then send them an email through their website or blog.

Check Out Other Authors

It’s time to go hit the websites for all the big authors who write in your genre. Especially if you know of an author who has a book coming out in the next few months. They often list all the stops on their blog tour. Go check out those reviewers and their guidelines.  (BTW – Keep all this info in your spreadsheet for future reference!)  To find more authors: Go to Amazon.com, type in an author’s name and hit enter, then check out the “Related Searches” results just under the search box.

In Closing

Putting together a good blog tour involves a bit of internet stalking sleuthing.  But it’s totally worth it when you put together a completed list of reviewers from all over. The goal of a blog tour isn’t just to get (hopefully) awesome reviews, but to reach reader circles you currently don’t have connections with. Go for variety!

Happy book tour scheduling!

Rebecca: Love the tips, Danyelle! I had my most successful blog tour with my latest novel using a few of these same ideas. However you’ve given me new ideas I will be incorporating into my next one as well. So thanks!

What about you? What ideas or tips do you have for successful blog tours? Any questions for Danyelle? Comment here.

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Author of Sweet Confections & Disabilities and the GospelBIO:

Danyelle Ferguson is the author of Sweet Confections (Indulgence Row series) and nonfiction book (dis)Abilities and the Gospel. She discovered her love for the written word in elementary school. Her first article was published when she was in 6th grade. Since then, she’s won several awards and has been published world-wide in newspapers, magazines and books. She’s grateful every day to work in her dream jobs – author, editor, and nurturing her readaholic tendencies.

She grew up surrounded by Pennsylvania’s beautiful Allegheny Mountains. Then lived for ten years among the majestic Wasatch Mountains. She is currently experiencing mountain-withdrawal while living in Kansas with her husband and four angels-in-training. She enjoys reading, writing, dancing & singing in the kitchen, and the occasional long bubble bath to relax from the everyday stress of being “Mommy.”

BOOKS:

Sweet Confections by Danyelle Ferguson

Disabilities and the Gospel

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Other March Book Madness Posts:

Make sure to check back on Thursday, March 12, for our next guest presenter, Charity Bradford, author of The Magic Wakes, Stellar Cloud, and Fade Into Me. She’ll be discussing writing–a hobby or career?

MARCH BOOK MADNESS:

Welcome to the fourth year of March BOOK Madness. Every Tuesday and Thursday in March, I invite several fellow authors to share their thoughts on the writing world, basically giving them an open mic to talk about anything book-ish.

2015 MARCH BOOK MADNESS SCHEDULE 

Previous Years:

2014 MARCH BOOK MADNESS:

2013 MARCH BOOK MADNESS:

2012 MARCH BOOK MADNESS:

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Author: Rebecca Belliston @rlbelliston

Hopeless romantic and author of CITIZENS OF LOGAN POND, SADIE and AUGUSTINA. Music nerd and composer of RELIGIOUS and CLASSICAL-STYLE music. I live in Michigan with my husband and five kids.

5 thoughts on “MBM: Unique Tips to Set Up a Successful Blog Tour by Danyelle Ferguson”

  1. Great tips, Danyelle. I needed them very much. I’ve just recently entered the Twitter world and don’t understand it at all…but your tip on how you used it made sense. Now to put your wise words into action.

    Like

    1. I remember when I started my Twitter account. There are a lot of interesting ways to use it for research, too. I’d recommend researching how to use hashtags. Some people use it for fun or snarky comments, but there are a lot of authors and agents that use them for special conversations. For example, agent Sara Megibow does #pubtip #SaraBookClub and my favorite #10queriesin10tweets

      Enjoy diving into TwitterLand!

      Like

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